Rondebosch Reviews

12 Customer Reviews
 
(6)
 
(6)
 
(0)
 
(0)
 
(0)

Independent, impartial reviews of Rondebosch from SafariNow users

Write a review of Rondebosch
Showing 1 to 12 of 12

Pleasure to visit - Rondebosch is not too far from major attractions. It has easy access to major routes in area.

Sherwin Leaf
South Africa

The best place to stay! - I LOVE Rondebosch! I have lived here for 61 years! As a destination for visitors, it is central to everything. 10 minutes drive from the airport, 10 minutes drive to the City Centre and about 20 minutes to the nearest beaches. Rondebosch also offers easy access to the starts of many hikes in Cape Town. There are some wonderful restaurants in Rondebosch and it's just the best place to be if you are visiting Cape Town!

Wendy / Tracey Gibb
South Africa

Rondebosch revisited. - I grew up in Rondebosch and it was very interesting revisiting all the places that I had knew so well nearly 50 years on.

Janet Burns
South Africa

Convenient - Lovely area to stay in. Peaceful suburb, close to all amenities.

Faure Burger
South Africa

Beautiful and well established - A beautiful and serene suburb with an old world feeling.

Petro Lubbe
South Africa

Peaceful - I really liked the tranquility and being able to walk everywhere.

Nomaswazi Mlaba
South Africa

My thoughts about Rondebosch - What I like about Rondebosch is you can walk wherever you want during the day. Everyone is friendly and helpful. The town is clean, very different to Joburg.

Susanne Dallner
South Africa

Rondebosch - From Company vegetable and fruit garden to much revered centre for academic excellence and a thriving residential suburb. It was Jan van Riebeeck who named the area behind Devil's Peak "Het Ronde Doornbosjen" after a round cluster of trees, possibly near a Khoi stockade, on the hillock where St. Paul's Church sits today. For many years the various peoples of the Cape followed a wagon track to these fertile lands, a track which amazingly lay much where Main Road is today. After van Riebeeck praised the areas potential for growing fruit and vegetables, nine of the "free burghers" in l657were allowed to farm the land on either side of the Liesbeek River. In the years that followed, more grants were extended and more farms developed, including Groote Schuur and Rustenburg, which were government owned. Rondebosch, as it would become known, was one of the first "domesticated" suburbs in South Africa. The style of the public buildings and larger houses of the wealthy burghers was either classis Dutch or Baroque. In 1705 Peter Kolbe, an atronomer, arrived at the Cape to make observations. His description of the quaint gardens in Rondebosch needs to be quoted in full. "Several beautiful country seats, vineyards and gardens are to be seen on almost every side of the Table-hill. The Company has two very spacious, beautiful Gardens. In one of them stands, erected at the Company's EXpense, a noble Pleasure-House for the Govenor and near it a beautiful Grove of Oaks, called the Round-Bush from which this Garden takes its name, being called the Round-Bush garden. The other garden, which is at some distance from this, is called Newland because it was planted later. Both these gardens are finely watered by the Springs on the Table-Hill. Not surprisingly, Kolbe, would remain at the Cape until 1713. Kolbe House is today a residence for students. Although the "tow" is scarcely mentioned much before 1811, authorized visitis of inspection were conducted to see what conditions Free Burghers were farming under. By the mid 1800's St. Paul's old Church records show that there were a large volume of gardeners and foreigners well dispersed within the local community. Very few other sburbs can lay claim to the host of famous people as those who built this village from vegetable gardens. Rondebosch has thrived with botanists, naturalists, poets, astronomers, prime ministers, road builders and even artists like Thomas Bowler frequenting the surrounding area. In 1900 Rondebosch Boys' High School bought Canigou farm. The name given to the home of the previous owner, GTB Twycross, survives at the school, and the girls' school next door bears the name of the other old house on the estate, Oakhurst. In 1849 Bishop Gray for his newly founded school, Diocesan College, which had outgrown its previous premises. As early as 1866 there was a school Rusteburg, but it was in 1894 that Rustenburg School for Girls opened its doors. The original Rustenburg house where important visitors to the Cape and even important political prisioners (like the Rajah of Tambera, and "other" Macassarian exiles of courtly rank) were lodged, was destroyed along with a number of other fine houses in the area, in a fire that swept down from the mountain in the 1850's. Today, Rondebosch is a thriving suburb, much loved by Capetonians. The institutions of academic excellence still stand, including South Africa's oldest universtiy and around them, cluster the homes of modern Rondebosch residents. Flats house students from all the corners of the globe, old officers' semis ring to the sounds of young families, cottages in the village are lovingly cared for, some by the folk that have lived there their whole lives, Victorian mansions still grace Silwood, while "sturdily built" 30's houses prop up the Golden Mile and all around ring the echoes of the past.

Enid Knight
South Africa

Rondebosch - The leafy suburb of Rondebosch is very centrally situated and is about 20 minutes by car to the airport, the city and most major beaches. It was named “Ronde Doornbosien” after a clump of thorn bushes found by the Dutch at the time of Jan van Riebeeck. A great landmark is the Rondebosch common, a large green belt and National Monument boasting a number of unique species of indigenous plants. The common is enjoyed by many people for recreational walks or jogging. Victorian homes abound Rondebosch as well as many homes designed by the famous architect Sir Herbert Baker. Rondebosch is known as the academic area of Cape Town as it has many of the major Cape Schools as well as the University of Cape Town on the slopes of Devils Peak. Mosterts Mill and the Presidential home of many South African presidents are also to be found in Rondebosch. The Rondebosch fountain is in the Main Road and it is on this corner that one can pick up a bunch of freshly cut flowers from the flower sellers. Another attraction of Rondebosch are the sporting facilities. Next door to Rondebosch is Newlands, home to the Newlands stadium for rugby and soccer, and Newlands Cricket Ground.

June Arderne

Rondebosch and Surrounds - Right below the University of Cape Town and Devil's Peak, lies a small gem of a village, unspoilt and vibrant! An outdoor market offering a wide variety of organic and biodynamic fresh produce as well as preserves, cheeses and hand made goods. Venue outside Rondebosch Library. Rondebosch is the most tranquil little pocket under the mountain's watchful eye, the energy is formidable, with fresh deli's and flat white coffees! It is right next to the world famous Newlands Rugby Stadium, Try it sometime!

kate rupprecht
South Africa

Lovely - Rondebosch is a lovely area to stay in Cape Town.

Bernice Botha
South Africa

Central - Rondebosch is very close to Cape Town, the V & A Waterfront, Seapoint, the airport and all shopping centers. Easy access to major highways.

Anwar Buckus
South Africa